Tag Archives: accountant in toledo

Buy-Sell Agreements: Are You Prepared?

Business scenario: Fifteen years ago, I and three others started a business. We had our corporate attorney draft a buy-sell agreement which we all signed.Fast forward to current day. A triggering event occurs (a member quits, is voted out due to lack of performance, retires, becomes disabled, is going through bankruptcy, is having a divorce, etc.), what happens? Our buy-sell agreement was never updated, so what happens is dependent upon what the agreement stated 15 years ago.

In this specific case, there are a number of variables that can drastically affect the outcome of the situation at hand. If there is a shareholder dispute, the process will be fairly lengthy as a result of involving multiple attorneys and the appeals process. Who owns the stock during this timeframe? Does the former shareholder, who feels was voted out of the business unfairly, still get distributions during the lengthy appeals process?

Or, what if a member is going through a divorce, the ex-spouse wants part of the other spouse’s percentage of ownership in the business. Does the buy-sell agreement limit this from happening?

If life insurance policies are in place on each of the owners in case a triggering event occurs. Will the proceeds from the policies be enough to purchase the interest of the departing owner? Does the policy amount cover the total value of the departing member’s interest? If not, what other funding vehicle is going to be to purchase the interest? Also, is the value received by the departing member or member’s spouse “in the ballpark” of what was expected; or is there going to be some ill feelings when it is all said and done between friends (now former friends), family, etc.?

buy-sellagreementSo, let me ask you this, do you have a buy-sell agreement in place? When was it last updated? Does the buy-sell agreement address any of the items mentioned in above? Are the intentions of the ownership group the same as they were when the last buy-sell agreement was signed? Does the buy-sell agreement actually meet the expectations of those signing it?

These are critical questions that must be considered when involved in a buy-sell agreement.  Whatever you spend on a buy-sell, it will be a drop in the bucket compared to what it can save you.

A buy-sell agreement provides the peace of mind knowing that their business. It also:

  • Provides money to create a fair market value exchange
  • Promotes equitable and orderly transfer of wealth, ownership and management
  • May offer tax advantages
  • Guarantees heirs a buyer for assets they may not know how to manage
  • Provides heirs cash to pay estate debt, expenses and taxes

It is far much easier to take the time now to ensure all your “ducks are in a row” while the interests of the parties involved are in alignment. Once a triggering event does occur, the interest of the parties involved generally diverge, and either the buyer or the seller will ultimately be unhappy and unsatisfied. Which end of the spectrum will you be on? Contact our buy-sell agreement specialists today at leininger@wvco.com or call (419) 891-1040 and ask for Ryan Leininger.

By: Ryan Leininger, CPA, CVA

Cash Flow Management

The entrepreneurial spirit that compels people to start their own business does not necessarily translate into them being good business managers and this can lead to a stumbling block for many small business owners.

cashFlowOne of the most troubling aspects of running a small business can be learning how to manage cash flow. Understanding the basics of cash flow can help owners plan for large and small upcoming events in their business.

Cash is what you have at any given time to meet your daily expenses. The cash spent to buy inventory or business equipment is an asset on your balance sheet, but cannot be easily converted to pay monthly expenses. Profit on an income statement does not equate to cash in the bank if you have accounts receivables which require payment. You can’t spend profit. A profit on the income statement does not always indicate financial health unless the company also has a positive cash flow that correlates to those profits.

Many business owners use a cash flow statement to help them understand the movement of cash in their business. A cash flow statement will tell them the sources and uses of their cash.

A typical statement has three areas:

  1. Operating cash flow – is the cash generated from the day-to-day operations of the business. For example, the sale of products, the collection of accounts receivable and payments from vendors.
  2. Investing cash flow –  the cash that is used to purchase equipment.
  3. Financing cash flow – cash from outside normal business operations. For example, money from lenders or shareholders. A new loan or the repayment of a loan creates the cash inflow or outflow.

Good cash flow management requires the business owner to be forward thinking – when and how will cash be needed. How will I acquire the cash needed- thru better accounts receivable collection or from a bank in the form of a loan?

Acquiring the skills necessary to become adept at cash flow management could mean the difference between business success and business failure.

William Vaughan Company has the skill and expertise to help our clients with all aspects of their business management and cash flow is just a small part of overall good business management.

By: Chris Schultz. Accountant

Can Your Business Save More by Paying More?

A client recently sent me a notification they received from the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) informing them that they could reduce their unemployment tax rate by making a voluntary additional payment. Usually, paying more taxes in is something employers try to avoid doing, but for certain employers, making this voluntary payment may save them money.

Unemployment application Form with pen, calculator

The unemployment rate that employers pay is largely based on their experience rate – the lower their experience rate, the lower their tax rate. The experience rate is dependent on factors such as how much the employer has paid into its account, how much has been paid out in claims, as well as what the average annual taxable wage amount is. If the employer has paid in enough contributions, their account could reach a certain threshold that could reduce the experience rate. The ODJFS will usually notify the employer whether an additional voluntary contribution would help the employer reach that threshold to reduce its rate.

A basic calculation is included with the ODJFS notification that allows the employer to estimate whether the tax savings is more than what the voluntary payment would be. In the case of my client, it did not benefit them enough to make the voluntary payment, but depending on how many employees your business has, the voluntary payment could end up saving you tax dollars. Please contact your William Vaughan Company representative should you need any further guidance.

2014 Year-end Payroll tax information and 2015 updates

Social Security and Medicare withholding
The employee’s and employer’s portion of social security taxes withheld has remained unchanged (6.2%). The wage base for 2014 is $117,000. In 2015 the wage base will increase to $118,500.

For 2014 and 2015 the Medicare tax calculation rates are unchanged. The employee’s and employer’s Medicare tax remains at 1.45% with no wage limits. Earners making more than $200,000 in a year are subject to an extra 0.9% Medicare tax. The extra 0.9% tax is not matched by the employer like the 1.45% Medicare tax.

year-end940 FUTA Unemployment tax
The 2014 and 2015 FUTA rate remains at 0.6%. This rate includes the 5.4% credit for State Unemployment paid. There are still credit reduction states published by the IRS and listed on Schedule A (Form 940). A “credit reduction state” is a state that has borrowed money from the federal government to pay unemployment benefits and has not yet repaid this money. In 2014, there are 7 states listed on this credit reduction list. Some of the state changes include:

  • Ohio – .012
  • Indiana .015
  • New York – .012
  • North Carolina – .012

This means that instead of paying the 0.6% in 2014, there is an additional 1.2 % added (or 1.5% for IN), for a total of 1.8% for Ohio. The credit reduction will add up to approximately $84- $126 of extra tax liability per employee for this year. Each year the % will increase another .003 until the state is no longer on the list published by the IRS each fall. Line 11 of the 2014 940 Form is where the amount from Schedule A, calculating your state credit reduction amount is entered. The extra 940 deposit will need to be paid thru EFTPS.gov by January 31, 2015.

1099 Misc forms
These forms are the most common. They are issued to independent contractors who received $600 or more for their services in the calendar year. Make sure you have their address and social security/Federal ID number and any DBA company name in your software. Now is the time to contact the vendors for any missing information and ask them fill out a W-9 form with their current information.
If you have any other questions with other 1099 forms, please contact our company.

Sandra Stone, Accountant

House Approves the Renewal of Tax Breaks

United_States_House_of_Representatives.svgLast Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to renew more than 50 expired tax breaks for individuals and businesses through the end of 2014. With an overwhelming pass of 378-46 for the one-year retroactive renewal, it now moves on to the Senate, who is increasingly likely to follow suit.

Among the biggest breaks for businesses are a tax credit for research and development, an exemption that allows financial companies such as banks and investment firms to shield foreign profits from being taxed by the U.S. and several provisions that allow businesses to write off capital investments more quickly.

The biggest tax break for individuals allows people who live in states without an income tax to deduct state and local sales taxes on their federal returns. Another protects struggling homeowners who get their mortgages reduced from paying income taxes on the amount of debt that was forgiven.

Many people are watching this bill as we are in the heart of tax planning season and a lot of these provisions could benefit business owners and individuals. The 10-year cost of the one-year bill is about $42 billion.

By: Amy Slates, CPA

Tax-Free Employee Fringe Benefits

fringe_benefitsEmployer-provided fringe benefits can be an important part of an overall compensation package. Highly valued by employees, benefits are even more prized when they fall under an exception from being taxed. Below is a generalized, non-inclusive listing of some of the most commonly provided tax-free benefits. In most cases, they are not subject to social security or FUTA tax as well.

• Accident or health insurance premiums, including contributions to health savings accounts (HSAs)
• Achievement awards—property given for length of service or safety achievement
• Personal use of a company-provided cell phone provided primarily for business use
• Holiday gifts (non-cash) with a nominal fair market value
• Occasional parties or picnics for employees
• Coffee, doughnuts, or soft drinks provided on the employer’s premises
• Occasional meals or meal money provided to enable the employee to work overtime
• Group term-life insurance (limited)
• Educational assistance up to $ 5,250 under a formal written plan
• Reimbursement of deductible moving expenses
• Employee discounts on property or services you offer to your customers
• Qualified transportation benefits, including transit passes or qualified parking
• Reimbursed job-related expenses incurred by an employee under an accountable plan
• Contributions to qualified retirement plans
• Advice concerning the above retirement plan, and retirement planning in general

Note that cash and cash-equivalent fringe benefits (such as gift cards, prepaid cards, etc), no matter how small, are never excludable. They must always be included in the employee’s payroll amounts.

Many of the above items are tax-exempt only if paid under a formal, written plan which does not discriminate. Also, benefits are often limited for company owners, partners, and highly compensated employees.

If any of the above might be a useful addition to your company’s compensation package, be sure to contact your WVCO tax pro for details in implementing the benefit.

By: George Monger, Senior Manager

Don’t Leave Health Care Dollars on the Table

Don’t make the mistake of waiting until the end of December to review your finances. You might not have enough time to take full advantage of some money-saving strategies before the ball drops. Here are some healthy yearend moves you may be able to make.

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Check your deductibles

Many health insurance plans have an annual deductible. If you’ve already met yours for the year, now’s the time to schedule any elective procedures you’ve been considering. If it doesn’t look like you’re going to meet your deductible this year, then switch gears and push any non-urgent visits into next year. That might help youmeet your deductible in 2015.

Max out your benefits

Be sure to take advantage of any benefits your health plan provides you free of charge. For example, it may cover an annual physical and various screenings.

If your employer sponsors a wellness program, don’t wait until the end of the year to check your status. You may be eligible for additional rewards for doing something as simple as scheduling a screening.

Review your FSA

If you have a health flexible spending account (FSA) through your employer, check your balance. If you have more money in your account than you can spend by the end of the year, see if the plan offers a grace period so employees can spend down their funds. Or the plan may allow employees to carry over a certain amount to the next year. Find out if your employer offers one of these options.

Tax tips

If you usually itemize deductions on your tax return, you may want to brush up on the details about the medical expense deduction. You won’t be able to qualify for it until your expenses are over 10% of your adjusted gross income (7.5% if you or your spouse is 65 or older). If you’re close to reaching the threshold, it may influence the decisions you make about elective procedures. You can only deduct unreimbursed medical expenses that exceed the threshold.