Tag Archives: standard mileage rate

IRS Releases 2015 Standard Mileage Rates

The IRS has recently announced the 2015 standard mileage rates available for use in calculating the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes. Starting January 1, 2015, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car, van, pickup or panel truck will be 57.5 cents per mile for business miles driven, which is up from the 56 cents per mile currently allowed in 2014. In addition, the rate will change to 23 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, which is actually down half a cent from the 2014 rate. The rate for charitable miles driven will remain at 14 cents per mile as this rate is fixed by Congress.

Mileage_Car
Some may wonder why there is such a difference between the business miles rate and the rate for medical or moving purposes. The reasoning behind this is that, in calculating the rate for business miles driven, the IRS uses an annual study of the various fixed and variable costs associated with operating a vehicle. These costs include depreciation, insurance, repairs, tires, maintenance, gas and oil. As inflation causes the cost of many of these expenses to rise, the IRS adjusts their rate for business miles accordingly. In contrast, the rate for medical and moving purposes is based only on variable costs, like gas and oil. As we have all noticed, prices at the pump have dropped considerably in recent months. In fact, the U.S. Department of Energy predicts the average price for a gallon of gas to be $2.60 in 2015, the lowest full-year average since 2009. As a result, the rate for medical or moving purposes has decreased to account for this expected drop in gas prices.

It is important to remember that these standard mileage rates are optional, and taxpayers always have the option of deducting their actual costs incurred with operating a vehicle. While deducting the actual costs may require more work, due to the increased recordkeeping required, in many cases the actual costs method provides the greatest benefit. It is also important to note that, when choosing to use the standard mileage rates, taxpayers should always keep an accurate and detailed log of their miles traveled for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

By: Ruben Becerra, Staff Accountant

Driving A Lot? Deduct Your Mileage

I recently met with a client who is starting a new investment firm. He asked me how to determine if an expense can be classified at a business expense. He told me he drives to meet with potential partners and was wondering if any of that mileage would be considered a business expense. I told him if you are using your vehicle to meet people or to scope out locations, etc. then absolutely, those situations would fall under the business expense category.

The question then came up of how to track these expenses in order to receive the deduction. I explained there are two different methods, the first being the allowance method and the second, tracking the actual expenses. Each of these methods has a sidenote worthy of mentioning. The allowance method must be elected in the first year the vehicle is used for business purposes. If it is not, it cannot be used.

Mileage

The allowance method replaces taking a deduction for actual operating costs and depreciation. You can, however, deduct parking fees and tolls that are paid for business purposes. If you use the allowance method, you must keep records of your business trips. These records need to be comprised of the date, customer or client visited, the purpose and the number of miles travelled for business. This can be used for leased vehicles as well. However, it must be used for the entire lease period. The log can be kept electronically or on paper, but must be available at the request of the IRS. The total business miles for the year are then multiplied by the IRS standard mileage rate, $.56 in 2014, and deducted on the tax return.

Actual expenses can be deducted in the first year if the allowance method is not elected, or in any future year. This is only true if the vehicle is not leased. However, electing in a future year forfeits any first-year accelerated depreciation that may be available. Actual expenses must be tracked for items like, gasoline, oil, repairs, license tags, insurance, etc. Depreciation or lease payments can also be deducted. If the vehicle is also used personally, then the total expenses are allocated based on the business use percentage. This percentage is determined based on the total miles driven for the year and the business miles driven for the year.

Deducting automobile expenses can surely save you money on your tax return, just make sure you gather the appropriate documentation the select the right method for your deduction.

To receive a free copy of William Vaughan Company’s mileage log, email Jessica Sloan at sloan@wvco.com

By: Tara West, CPA, CMA

Standard Mileage Rate Changes for 2013

From the Journal of Accountancy:

Optional standard mileage rates for use of a vehicle will go up by 1 cent per mile for 2013, the IRS said Wednesday (Notice 2012-72). Taxpayers can use the optional standard mileage rates to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile.

For business use of a car, van, pickup truck, or panel truck, the 2013 rate will be 56.5 cents per mile. Driving for medical or moving purposes may be deducted at 24 cents per mile. Both rates are 1 cent higher than for 2012.

The rate for service to a charitable organization is unchanged, set by statute (Sec. 170(i)) at 14 cents a mile.

The portion of the business standard mileage rate that is treated as depreciation will be 23 cents per mile for 2013, unchanged from 2012.

For purposes of computing the allowance under a fixed and variable rate (FAVR) plan, the maximum standard automobile cost for 2013 is $28,100 for automobiles (not including trucks and vans) or $29,900 for trucks and vans, increases of $100 and $600, respectively, from 2012. Under an FAVR plan, a standard amount is deemed substantiated for an employer’s reimbursement to employees for expenses they incur in driving their vehicle in performing services as an employee for the employer.

This article was authored by Paul Bonner at the Journal of Accountancy